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3 edition of International trade in cloves, nutmeg, mace, cinnamon, cassia and their derivatives found in the catalog.

International trade in cloves, nutmeg, mace, cinnamon, cassia and their derivatives

A. E. Smith

International trade in cloves, nutmeg, mace, cinnamon, cassia and their derivatives

by A. E. Smith

  • 58 Want to read
  • 23 Currently reading

Published by Tropical Development and Research Institute in London .
Written in English


Edition Notes

StatementA.E. Smith.
The Physical Object
Pagination160p.
Number of Pages160
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL21548368M
ISBN 100859542025

  Nutmeg and mace have similar aromatic qualities, although nutmeg is slightly sweeter and mace is more delicate in flavor. Advertisement Uses: Use in Author: Sarah-Jane Bedwell. Cinnamon does not instantly spring to mind when one thinks of the spices that spurred European expansion into Asia during the sixteenth and seventeenth y, the trade in cloves, nutmeg and mace dominates discussions of the luxury goods that allowed sailors and merchants to amass fortunes and encouraged further European domination of the Indian Ocean trade routes and the.

History of Cloves. Like the history of many spices, the history of cloves goes back many centuries. In fact, this spice was one of the first to be traded and evidence of cloves have been found in vessels dating as far back as BC. Native to the Malucca Islands, as many spices are, cloves were once a treasured commodity prized by the Ancient. The Trade in Spices selling goods from port to port. The principal and most profitable goods they traded in were spices - giving the routes their name. As early as bce, spices such as cinnamon from Sri Lanka and cassia from China found their way along the Spice Routes to the Middle East. Other goods exchanged hands too -.

  In it van Linschoten described for the first time the original locations of cloves, nutmeg, mace, cinnamon and other spices, blending his account with quaint observations of their daily uses. “The Indian women,” he recorded, “use much to chawe Cloves, thereby to have sweete breath, which the Portugales wives that dwell there, doe now 3/5(1). Cassia, spice consisting of the aromatic bark of the Cinnamomum cassia plant of the family Lauraceae. Similar to true cinnamon, cassia bark has a more pungent, less delicate flavour and is thicker than cinnamon bark. It contains from 1 to 2 percent oil of cassia, a volatile oil, the principal.


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International trade in cloves, nutmeg, mace, cinnamon, cassia and their derivatives by A. E. Smith Download PDF EPUB FB2

Get this from a library. International trade in cloves, nutmeg, mace, cassia and their derivatives. [A E Smith]. The Complete Book On Spices & Condiments (with Cultivation, Processing & Uses) 2nd Revised Edition by Niir Board Of Consultants & Engineers, ISBN:Rs.

/ US$. The smell of sweet cinnamon on your morning oatmeal, the gentle heat of gingerbread, the sharp piquant bite from your everyday peppermill.

The tales these spices could tell: of lavish Renaissance banquets perfumed with cloves, and flimsy sailing ships sent around the world to secure a scented prize; of cinnamon-dusted custard tarts and nutmeg-induced genocide; of pungent/5.

Focusing on the five premier spices—black pepper, cinnamon, nutmeg, cloves, and chili pepper—while also relating the story of many others along the way, Czarra describes how spices have been used in cooking throughout history and how their spread has influenced regional cuisines nutmeg the world.

The English derived the name allspice because the flavors of several spices, such as cloves, cinnamon, nutmeg and black pepper are combined in it. Native to the Caribbean and the Americas, Spanish explorers named it pimienta or pepper because the allspice berry resembles a large black peppercorn.

The Complete Book on Spices & Condiments (with Cultivation, Processing & Uses) 2nd Revised Edition Author: NIIR Board of Consultants & Engineers Cloves (f) Nutmeg and Mace (g) Cinnamon Conclusion BULBOUS SPICES Onion International Trade More Recent International Trade Future Prospects Ajowan or Bishop s Weed.

Trade in herbs and spices and trends in their use. Some of the main spice-producing areas are listed in Appendix 2. The current annual global trade in spices is – million tonnes valued at US $3– billion. The value of the spice trade is particularly dependent on pepper prices as pepper remains the main spice in international by: 6.

2 Major spice crops in cinnamon trade In terms of world trade value, the most important spice crops from the tropical regions are pepper, capsicums, nutmeg/mace, cardamom, allspice/pimento, vanilla, cloves, ginger, cinnamon and cassia, and turmeric.

Coriander, cumin, mustard, and sesame seeds and. Spices and the Spice Trade. Spices are derived from mineral and plant origins.

The most fundamentally important spice is salt—a mineral. Yet, trade in spices of plant origin from tropical South and Southeast Asia—pepper, cinnamon, cloves, nutmeg, and mace—stimulated European "scientific thought during the Renaissance and the explorations and the empire building that followed" (Küster.

Cassia, the bark of the evergreen cassia tree, is a similar spice to cinnamon but the coarser and less fragrant and therefore considered to be of lower quality. In the following text, the word cinnamon is used as a general term for both species. When a specific species is meant, this is indicated specifically (as cassia or Ceylon cinnamon).

Spices including cinnamon, cloves, peppers, ginger, nutmeg and mace are a major part of the export offerings from developing countries destined for de. International Trade in Cloves, Nutmeg, Mace, Cinnamon, Cassia and their Derivatives (No. /S). [11]. Sri Lanka's Cinnamon, the pride among world's spices.

Despite their use in mild dishes like custard and stewed fruit, nutmeg and mace actually include some of the same oils that flavor pepper and cloves.

Nutmeg and mace also contain hallucinogens and can be fatally toxic if used in a large quantity, for example, eating an entire nutmeg. International Trade Centre, UNCTAD/GATT, Geneva. ITC. Markets for selected medicinal plants and their derivatives. International Trade Centre/UNCTAD/GATT, Geneva.

ITC. The gum arabic market and the development of production. Smith, A.E. International trade in cloves, nutmeg, mace, cinnamon, cassia and their derivatives.

The nutmeg tree is a large evergreen, it produces two spices — mace and nutmeg. Nutmeg is the seed kernel inside the fruit and mace is the lacy covering (aril) on the kernel. The nutmeg seed is encased in a mottled yellow, edible fruit, the approximate size and shape of a small peach.

vegetable products as pepper, cinnamon, nutmeg, mace, allspice, ginger etc; such condiments collectively enrich, or alter the quality of a thing especially to a small degree; spices alter the taste of food, give zest or pleasant flavouring or a relish”.

Rosengarten () an expert in spices, in his book ‘The Book of. Its imports of nutmeg have increased by an annual average of 3% sincewhile imports from developing countries increased by 4%.

Germany and Italy also offer opportunities for developing-country exporters, as their share of nutmeg imported directly from developing countries is relatively high, at 60% and 82% respectively. SMITH, A.E. () International Trade in Cloves, Nutmeg, Mace, Cinnamon, Cassia and their Derivatives.

TDRI Report G pp. London: Tropical Development and Research Institute [now Chatham: Natural Resources Institute]. WANG, C.L. () The yields and composition analyses of essential oils from planting Cinnamomum osmophloeum Kaueh. Seasonings such as cinnamon, cassia, cardamom, ginger, and turmeric were important items of commerce in the earliest evolution of trade.

Cinnamon and cassia found their way to the Middle East at least 4, years ago. From time immemorial, southern Arabia (Arabia Felix of antiquity) had been a trading centre for frankincense, myrrh, and other fragrant resins and gums.

PREFACE There is a continuing and expanding international demand for herbs, spices and essential oils. Social changes, including food diversification, the desire for new flavours, increasing importance of “ethnic” food and the increased importance of processed food, which requires condiments and aromatic herbs for its preparation, are driving an increase in this demand.

Allspice, Bay Rum, Bay Leaves, Capers, Cloves, Cinnamon, Camphor, Witch Hazel & Nutmeg. Myrtle Family (Myrtaceae) Allspice (Pimenta dioica) Allspice comes from the dried, green berries of Pimenta dioica, a central American tree of the myrtle family (Myrtaceae).It is also known as pimento; however, the red pimentos that are stuffed into green olives are actually a variety of sweet chile pepper.Nutmeg has been found in the graves of Egyptian mummies.

In the 10 th century, Arabs knew the spice and in the 12 th century, even Europeans revered it as an extremely precious spice. Its history is similar to the history of cloves and is full of bloodletting, fabulous wealth, impoverishment of native workers and suffering of sailors on sailing ships full of nutmeg as a cargo.Spices are high value, export-oriented crops used extensively in food and beverage flavourings, medicines, cosmetics and perfumes.

Interest is growing however in the theoretical and practical aspects of the biosynthetic mechanisms of active components in spices as well as the relationship between the biological activity and chemical structure of these secondary metabolites.